November 20 Presidential Democratic Primary Debate

How to Watch Tonight’s Debates: https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/20/politics/how-to-watch-democratic-debate/index.html

Who is debating?

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden
  • New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker
  • South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg
  • Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
  • California Sen. Kamala Harris
  • Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar
  • Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders
  • Businessman Tom Steyer
  • Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren
  • Businessman Andrew Yang

Who didn’t make the cut?

  • Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro
  • Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet
  • Montana Gov. Steve Bullock
  • Former Maryland Rep. John Delaney
  • Author Marianne Williamson
  • Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick
  • Former Pennsylvania Rep. Joe Sestak

2019 Municipal Elections

Tuesday, November 5th: 2019 Municipal Elections!
November 5th, 2019 is election day for many municipalities across the Commonwealth! Be sure to make it to the polls if your city/town has an election, and spread the word to your family and friends! And keep in mind that polling locations run on different schedules depending on municipality. Check here to see all cities/towns holding elections and the hours that polls are open for each: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/elemuniele/munieleidx.htm If you have questions about voting, contact the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s Elections and Voting Division at this toll free number: 1-800-462-VOTE (8683). You can also email them at elections@sec.state.ma.us

2020 Presidential Forum on Disability Issues in January

Tickets are on sale now for AAPD’s forum on January 13, 2020 in Austin Texas. Tickets are only $10 and can be purchases here: https://www.aapd.com/advocacy/voting/2020-presidential-forum-on-disability-issues/.

We have not yet seen a list of participants or a schedule for the event.

Learn more about the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD).

Electing People with Disabilities

People with disabilities are increasing their ranks in elected office. But they’re still underrepresented.

www.inquirer.com

From the Philadelphia Inquirer by Stephanie Lai, October 20, 2019

A study at Rutgers University shows that more people with disabilities are being elected to local, state and federal government with the greatest proportion at the local level. The Massachusetts disability community has great advocates in Massachusetts who should run for office!

You can also read the Rutgers Study.

Disability Policy Questions for Candidates

From the Center for American Progress:

Interestingly, the Center for American Progress is not a disability organization. Read the article by Rebecca Coakley on October 15, 2019: 10 Disability Policy Questions Every Presidential Candidate Should Answer.

The questions are listed here, but read the whole article for more context.

  1. It is still legal for disabled people to earn pennies an hour thanks to a loophole in the Fair Labor Standards Act. How will you close it and help these works transition to the fairly paid workplace?
  2. Adding asset limits and work requirements to programs that help people with disabilities and their families access food, housing, and health care means that folks in need are constantly on the edge of economic instability. How would you address this?
  3. Almost 30 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), 60 percent to 80 percent of polling places still remain inaccessible, leaving most disabled Americans unable to access the ballot box or see who they actually voted for. What would you do to increase access to democratic institutions for people with disabilities?
  4. Many candidates have talked about the need to invest in infrastructure. Clearly, this is important. In the past, accessibility has not been part of the conversation from the beginning, which has resulted in a persistent lack of access. What specifically would you to do ensure that accessibility and inclusion are included in your plan for the nation’s infrastructure and the jobs that come with it?
  5. How would you create a system of long-term services and supports that sustains the rights of disabled Americans to live in their homes as well as lifts up and supports the domestic workforce?
  6. Natural disasters are all too common, and climate change disproportionately affects the disability community. What is your plan for ensuring that disability issues and the community are front and center in your planning and execution of emergency management planning and your climate agenda?
  7. In more than 20 states, parents with disabilities can lose custody of their children largely on the basis of a disability diagnosis. How would you change this?
  8. Lack of affordable and accessible housing continues to be a significant impediment to people with disabilities and their families achieving economic security What changes would you implement to remedy this?
  9. What policies would your administration advance to improve access to quality affordable mental health care and protect the civil rights of people with mental illness?
  10. Children with disabilities, especially those who are also people of color, often have unequal access to educational resources, despite the law guaranteeing such access. What will your administration do differently?

Presidential Forum on Disability Issues

Elected for Inclusion – January 13, 2020

The American Association of People with Disabilities and REV UP Texas Announce
Elected for Inclusion: A Presidential Forum on Disability Issues

 
 
WASHINGTON, DC – The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and REV UP Texas are proud to announce Elected for Inclusion, our national nonpartisan Presidential forum on disability issues. The forum will take place on January 13, 2020 at the AT&T Hotel and Convention Center in Austin, Texas in advance of Super Tuesday and the November 2020 elections. 

Elected for Inclusion – the Presidential Forum on Disabilities Issues will place the pressing questions the disability community faces on center stage and give major party Presidential candidates an opportunity to discuss policy decisions that affect approximately 23% of the American electorate.

AAPD and REV UP Texas are hosting Elected for Inclusion as a means of highlighting the power of the disability vote. In 2020, over 35 million eligible voters will be people with disabilities.  The number of “disability voters” increases to over 62 million when we consider the ripple effect of the disability vote that connects families, friends, advocates, educators, providers, and other individuals that interact with people with disabilities.

AAPD President and CEO Maria Town stated, “Now, more than ever before, Presidential candidates know they must address issues important to the disability community and involve people with disabilities in their campaigns. Elected for Inclusion is an unparalleled opportunity for candidates to set forth their platforms and better understand this powerful, growing constituency.”

The disability community has a significant stake in the results of local, state, and federal elections this November. Our elected officials determine the direction and funding of the programs and services people with disabilities rely on for healthcare and independent living. Justin Dart, father of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and AAPD co-founder, said it best: “Vote as if your life depended on it, because it does.”

For more information on Elected for Inclusion: A Presidential Forum on Disability Issues and the REV UP Campaign, visit www.aapd.com/advocacy/voting/. The REV UP Campaign offers a host of information on registering to vote, increasing civic engagement, and state-specific resources and events.